1. Personal eTextbook (Kortext) 2 items
    1.  

    2. Forensic psychology: concepts, debates and practice - Joanna R. Adler, Jacqueline M. Gray 2010

      Book Essential – PeT This is your Personal eTextbook (Kortext) access the book from your myLearning module area as above

  2. Referencing & Plagiarism 1 item
    1. Cite them right online is the referencing standard for Psychology.  It will help you to reference just about any source (be it print, electronic or performance), and to understand the importance of referencing accurately.

       

      Please Note: Psychology uses the APA (American Psychological Association) referencing system.  Cite Them Right uses the Harvard referencing system as a default so you will need to change this to APA by selecting it from the referencing system drop down menu.

       

      More information on Referencing & Plagiarism can be found here.

  3. Essential 6 items
    1. The criminal process - Ashworth, Andrew, Redmayne, Mike 2010

      Book Essential

    2. Forensic psychology: theory, research, policy and practice - Jennifer Brown, Yvonne Shell, Terri Cole 2015

      Book Essential

    3. Handbook of psychology of investigative interviewing: current developments and future directions - Bull, Ray, Valentine, Tim, Williamson, Tom 2009 (electronic resource)

      Book Essential

    4. Forensic psychology - David A. Crighton, Graham J. Towl 2015 (electronic resource)

      Book Essential

    5. Forensic psychology: crime, justice, law, interventions - Graham Davies, Anthony R. Beech, British Psychological Society 2018

      Book Essential

    6. Psychology and law: a critical introduction - Andreas Kapardis 2014

      Book Essential

  4. Recommended 9 items
    1. Professionalizing offender profiling: forensic and investigative psychology in practice - Alison, Laurence J., Rainbow, Lee 2011 (electronic resource)

      Book Recommended

    2. Investigative interviewing - Ray Bull 2014 (electronic resource)

      Book Recommended

    3. Handbook of psychology in legal contexts - Carson, David, Bull, Ray 2003 (electronic resource)

      Book Recommended

    4. The psychology of interrogations and confessions: a handbook - Gudjonsson, Gisli H. 2003 (electronic resource)

      Book Recommended

    5. Ashworth's principles of criminal law - Jeremy Horder, Andrew Ashworth 2019

      Book Recommended

    6. Practical psychology for forensic investigations and prosecutions - Kebbell, Mark R., Davies, Graham 2006 (electronic resource)

      Book Essential

    7. Psychology and law: truthfulness, accuracy and credibility - Memon, Amina, Vrij, Aldert, Bull, Ray 2003 (electronic resource)

      Book Recommended

    8. Investigative interviewing: rights, research and regulation - Williamson, Tom 2006 (electronic resource)

      Book Recommended

  5. Journals 3 items
    Students should keep abreast of developments in this area
  6. Session 1: Problematising Policing (Dr Jeffrey DeMarco) 10 items
    We will start with an introduction to this module and the practice contexts to which it relates. We will then move on to consider issues of procedural and distributive justice, and some wider social/personal factors that are influential in the interaction between the police and public. This includes understanding the principles of public-police interactions and relationships
    1. Essential 4 items
      1. Contact and confidence: revisiting the impact of public encounters with the police - Ben Bradford, Jonathan Jackson, Elizabeth A. Stanko 2009

        Article Essential

      2. Read the above article in conjunction with the Erratum published , please see below

    2. Additional 1 item
      1. The Oxford handbook of criminology - Alison Liebling, Maruna Shadd, Lesley McAra 2017

        Book Additional Coretta, P. & Bowling, B. Ethnicities, racism, crime and criminal justice (pp. 190-212).

    3. Introduction to policing - Michael Rowe 2018

      Book Additional

  7. Session 2: Police Cultures (Mr Mark Yexley) 8 items
    In this session we will consider the ‘police culture’ that exists in the modern police service. We will also discuss the implications of this and attempts to effect change in what has traditionally been an environment that is male dominated and lacks cultural diversity. This session will be given by Mark Yexley, who is a former police officer.
    1. Essential 4 items
      1. Changing Police Culture - J.B.L. Chan 1996

        Article Essential

      2. Chapter 6: Police culture - Michael Rowe 2018

        Chapter Digitisation

    2. Additional 3 items
  8. Session 3: Offender Profiling (Professor Mandeep Dhami) 16 items
    In this session we will explore the history and approaches to offender profiling, as well as the process involved. We will consider the scientific underpinnings of this discipline, and review research that has examined the effectiveness of offender profiling.
    1. Essential 4 items
      1. Forensic psychology: theory, research, policy and practice - Jennifer Brown, Yvonne Shell, Terri Cole 2015

        Book Essential Read chapter 9

      2. Criminal Profiling - Damon A. Muller 08/2000

        Article Essential

      3. The Criminal Profiling Illusion: What's Behind the Smoke and Mirrors? - B. Snook, R. M. Cullen, C. Bennell, P. J. Taylor 2008

        Article Essential

      4. Taking Stock of Criminal Profiling - Brent Snook, Joseph Eastwood, Paul Gendreau, Claire Goggin 04/2007

        Article Essential

    2. Additional 12 items
      1. Pragmatic solutions to offender profiling and behavioural investigative advice - Laurence Alison, Alasdair Goodwill, Louise Almond, Claudia Heuvel 02/2010

        Article Additional

      2. Professionalizing offender profiling: forensic and investigative psychology in practice - Alison, Laurence J., Rainbow, Lee 2011 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional Read chapters 1, 2, 3, 9 & 10

      3. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin. Special Issue: Violent Crime

        Journal Recommended Special issue of this journal. titled 'Violent Crime'

  9. Session 4: Interviewing Suspects (Dr Shola Apena Rogers) 9 items
    In this session we will review the literature regarding interviewing suspects, and examine practice both in the UK and USA. We will also consider research evidence regarding the effectiveness of interviewing.
    1. Essential 2 items
      1. Handbook of psychology in legal contexts - Carson, David, Bull, Ray 2003 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential Read : A structured model for investigative interviewing of suspects.

    2. Additional 7 items
      1. The psychology of interrogations and confessions: a handbook - Gudjonsson, Gisli H. 2003 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional Read chapter 2

      2. Interviewing Suspects - Home Office 03/08/2017

        Document Additional If the link is broken, visit https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/interviewing-suspects

  10. Session 5: Victims and survivors in the Criminal Justice System (Dr Miranda Horvath) 7 items
    In this session, we will consider how a victim is regarded within the Criminal Justice System of England and Wales. We will consider their rights (under EU and British law), their protections and their roles.
    1. Essential 3 items
    2. Additional 4 items
      1. Interviewing women bereaved by homicide - Anna Gekoski, Joanna R Adler, Jacqueline M Gray 09/2013

        Article Additional

      2. Children as victims: child-sized crimes in a child-sized world - Howard League for Penal Reform 2007

        Book Additional

  11. Session 6: Adults as Witnesses (Dr Jeffrey DeMarco) 9 items
    In this session we will review the theories of human memory, before moving on to address questions specific to police investigations, such as: What factors affect the quality & quantity of memory? Can eyewitness recall be enhanced by particular interview techniques? Can people’s memories for events be changed? Is eyewitness identification of suspects reliable? What are the appropriate techniques for good practice in interviewing witnesses, in line with what we learn about human memory? Specifically, we will explore the P.E.A.C.E model for police interviewing.
    1. Essential 2 items
      1. Handbook of psychology of investigative interviewing: current developments and future directions - Ray Bull, Tim Valentine, Tom Williamson 2009

        Book Essential Read: The relation between consistency and accuracy of eyewitness testimony: Legal versus cognitive explanations

    2. Additional 7 items
      1. Eyewitness Identification - N. Brewer, G. L. Wells 2011

        Article Additional

      2. Expert Testimony on Eyewitness Evidence: In Search of Common Sense - Kate A. Houston, Lorraine Hope, Amina Memon, J. Don Read 09/2013

        Article Additional

      3. Examining the relation between eyewitness recall and recognition for children and adults - Joanna D. Pozzulo, Julie L. Dempsey, Charmagne Crescini, Julie M.T. Lemieux 2009

        Article Additional

  12. Session 7: Detecting Deception (Dr Jeffrey DeMarco) 14 items
    Is it possible to tell when someone is telling the truth? Are experts, such as the police, better than non-experts at telling when they are being lied to? Can technology, such as the polygraph, improve the accuracy of deception detection? We will explore methods used in validating the use of the polygraph, but also other social scientific measures, such as Criteria Based Content Analysis (CBCA) in assessing deception. These are a few of the questions that will be considered during this session addressing a potentially very useful skill in the investigative process.
    1. Essential 3 items
      1. Eliciting cues to deception by tactical disclosure of evidence: The first test of the Evidence Framing Matrix - Pär Anders Granhag, Leif A. Strömwall, Rebecca M. Willén, Maria Hartwig 09/2013

        Article Essential

      2. Psychology and law: a critical introduction - Andreas Kapardis 2014

        Book Digitisation Read Chapter 8: Detecting deception, pp.247-289

      3. A cognitive approach to lie detection: A meta-analysis - Aldert Vrij, Ronald P. Fisher, Hartmut Blank 10/2015

        Article Essential

    2. Additional 11 items
      1. Handbook of psychology of investigative interviewing: current developments and future directions - Bull, Ray, Valentine, Tim, Williamson, Tom 2009 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional Read "Evaluating truthfulness: Detecting truths and lies in forensic contexts"

      2. Investigative interviewing: rights, research and regulation - Williamson, Tom 2006 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional "Investigative interviewing and the detection of deception" in Investigative interviewing: rights, research and regulation

      3. Meta-analysis of mock crime studies of the control question polygraph technique. - John C. Kircher, Steven W. Horowitz, David C. Raskin 1988

        Article Additional

      4. To act truthfully: Nonverbal behaviour and strategies during a police interrogation - Leif A. Strömwall, Maria Hartwig, Pär Anders Granhag 2006

        Article Additional

      5. Practical psychology for forensic investigations and prosecutions - Kebbell, Mark R., Davies, Graham 2006 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional "Detecting deception"

  13. Session 8: Confessions and Suggestibility (Dr Shola Apena Rogers) 8 items
    In this session we will continue the consideration of police interviewing of suspects by looking at the specific issue of confessions – both true and false. We will address the psychological and procedural factors that have been found to be associated with confession, including interrogative suggestibility and associated issues.
    1. Essential 3 items
    2. Additional 5 items
      1. The psychology of interrogations and confessions: a handbook - Gudjonsson, Gisli H. 2003 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional Read chapters 3 & 17

  14. Session 9: The Psychology of Forensic Analysis (Professor Mandeep Dhami) 11 items
    This week, we will focus on some of the other forensic sciences, namely fingerprinting and DNA analysis so that you can consider where forensic professional practice may go awry. In particular, we will highlight the cognitive processes and biases that may occur, and the potential for incriminating the wrong person.
    1. Essential 3 items
      1. Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward - National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences 2009

        Document Essential

    2. Additional 8 items
      1. From Forensics to Forensic Science - Roux, C.; Crispino, F.; Ribaux, O. 2012

        Article Additional

      2. Accuracy and reliability of forensic latent fingerprint decisions - B. T. Ulery, R. A. Hicklin, J. Buscaglia, M. A. Roberts 10/05/2011

        Article Additional

  15. Session 10: Interviewing Children and Vulnerable Witnesses (Dr Shola Apena Rogers) 11 items
    In this session we will consider the challenges of interviewing witnesses who are particularly vulnerable, such as children and those with learning disabilities. We will critically evaluate the use of particular interviewing techniques, rapport building and the use of aids such as anatomical dolls.
    1. Essential 4 items
      1. Achieving best evidence in criminal proceedings - Ministry of Justice 2011

        Document Essential Please read chapters 1, 2 and 3 of the Achieving Best Evidence (2011) guidelines

      2. Practical psychology for forensic investigations and prosecutions - Kebbell, Mark R., Davies, Graham 2006 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential "Interviewing victims of crime, including children and people with intellectual disabilities"

    2. Additional 7 items
      1. The psychology of interrogations and confessions: a handbook - Gudjonsson, Gisli H. 2003 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional Read chapter 12

      2. Handbook of psychology of investigative interviewing: current developments and future directions - Bull, Ray, Valentine, Tim, Williamson, Tom 2009 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional "The cognitive interview: Research and practice across the lifespan" in Handbook of psychology of investigative interviewing: current developments and future directions

      3. Child forensic psychology: victim and eyewitness memory - Holliday, Robyn, Marche, Tammy 2013

        Book Additional Particularly chapters 6, 7 & 8 (though the whole book is useful).

      4. Handbook of psychology of investigative interviewing: current developments and future directions - Bull, Ray, Valentine, Tim, Williamson, Tom 2009 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional "Recovered memories"

      5. Children's testimony: a handbook of psychological research and forensic practice - Lamb, Michael E., Westcott, Helen 2011 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional

      6. Forensic psychology: concepts, debates and practice - Adler, Joanna R., Gray, Jacqueline M. 2010 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional "The aging eyewitness

  16. Session 11: Working with Vulnerabilities in the Criminal Justice System (Dr Eve Hepburn) 8 items
    In this session we will consider best practice regarding working with vulnerabilities within the criminal justice system; and how theory and research can be applied to further improve practice throughout the CJS. This will include a critical account of research on diverse profiles, including concepts of disorder.
    1. Essential 3 items
      1. Gender, social support, and PTSD in victims of violent crime - Bernice Andrews, Chris R. Brewin, Suzanna Rose 08/2003

        Article Digitisation

    2. Additional 5 items
      1. Ageing in forensic psychiatric secure settings: the views of members of staff - Claudio Di Lorito, Tom Dening, Birgit Völlm 04/03/2019

        Article Additional

      2. Social Support and Developmental Psychopathology - Ross A. Thompson, Mary Fran Flood, Rebecca Goodvin 2006

        Chapter Digitisation

  17. Session 12: Jury Decision Making (Professor Mandeep Dhami) 10 items
    Juries are a particular forum in which important decisions have to be made. In this session we will set out to understand how jurors and juries make decisions, to identify the factors that may affect the quality of jury decision making, and explore ways in which jury decision making can be improved.
    1. Essential 4 items
      1. Jury Decision-Making: 45 Years of Empirical Research on Deliberating Groups - Dennis J. Devine, Laura D. Clayton, Benjamin Dunford, Rasmy Seying 2001

        Article Essential

      2. Psychology and law: a critical introduction - Andreas Kapardis 2014

        Book Essential Read chapter 5

      3. Predicting verdicts using pre-trial attitudes and standard of proof - Samantha Lundrigan, Mandeep K. Dhami, Katrin Mueller-Johnson 02/2016

        Article Essential

    2. Additional 6 items
      1. The validity of jury decision making research - Dematteo, D., Anumba, N. 2009

        Chapter Additional

      2. Jury decision-making biases and methods to counter them - Tarika Daftary-Kapur, Rafaele Dumas, Steven D. Penrod 2010

        Article Additional

      3. Experimental Research on Jury Decision-Making - MacCoun, Robert J Jun 2, 1989

        Article Additional

  18. Session 13: Prosecuting Sexual Violence in the Courts (Dr Sarah Heke) 8 items
    This session will start with a consideration of the development of legislation related to rape, and the changes in the definition of this offence. We will then move on to the consider how the attitudes of the public and legal professionals combine to make this a particularly challenging crime for victims to report and support through the trial process.
    1. Essential 3 items
      1. Forensic psychology: theory, research, policy and practice - Jennifer Brown, Yvonne Shell, Terri Cole 2015

        Book Essential Read chapter 3

      2. Carnal knowledge: rape on trial - Lees, Sue 2002

        Book Digitisation You probably won't be able to read it all, but read Chapter 1: Women speak out (pp.1-36), and as much of the rest as you can

    2. Additional 5 items
      1. Sexual assault and the justice gap: a question of attitude - Temkin, Jennifer, Krahé, Barbara 2008

        Book Additional

  19. Session 14: Civil Justice and Writing Expert Reports (Dr Eve Hepburn) 8 items
    In the first part of this session we will consider the roles of forensic psychologists in the civil courts. We will start with an overview of the civil court structure, then move to a comparison with the criminal courts. We will then identify some examples of when and how psychological input may be beneficial, considering some particular roles such as conducting psychological autopsy (which is particularly popular in America), and address the issues that arise in these situations. In the second part of the session we will return to the subject of writing expert reports, when you will have the opportunity to work on the final assessment for this module. It will be useful if you can bring at least an outline plan of your report to this session.
    1. Essential 2 items
      1. The Cambridge handbook of forensic psychology - Brown, Jennifer, Campbell, Elizabeth A. 2010 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential Please read the whole of Part V, which focuses on civil law.

      2. Introduction to the English legal system, 2019-2020 - Martin Partington 2019

        Book Recommended Chapters 7 & 8.

    2. Additional 6 items
      1. Evolution of the Psychological Autopsy: Fifty Years of Experience at the Los Angeles County Chief Medical Examiner-Coroner's Office - Timothy Botello, Thomas Noguchi, Lakshmanan Sathyavagiswaran, Linda E. Weinberger 2013

        Article Digitisation

      2. News Media Reporting on Civil Litigation and Its Influence on Civil Justice Decision Making. - Robbennolt, Jennifer K. 2003

        Article Additional This papers refer to U.S. civil law, but the issues raise also need to be considered in the U.K

      3. Unreliable assessment in civil litigation - Michael J. Scott, Sundeep Sembi 2002

        Article Additional

  20. Session 15: Sentencing Practice (Professor Mandeep Dhami) 10 items
    Sentencing is the stage of the justice system where society (via the sentencer) has an opportunity to respond to offenders. In this session you will be introduced to the sentencing framework in England and Wales. We will identify the main trends and disparities in sentencing decisions and examine the use of ‘extra-legal’ factors in sentencing. We will also critically evaluate the efforts to improve sentencing practice through the implementation of sentencing guidelines.
    1. Essential 4 items
      1. Exploring Sentencing Practice in England and Wales - J. V. Roberts 2015

        Book Print on Order Read Chapter: Using court records for sentencing research: Pitfalls and possibilities.

      2. Quasirational models of sentencing - Mandeep K. Dhami, Ian Belton, Jane Goodman-Delahunty 09/2015

        Article Essential

      3. Why punish? - Nigel Walker 1991

        Book Essential the whole book is relevant but at least chapter 1 should be read

    2. Additional 6 items
      1. The Oxford handbook of criminology - Mike Maguire, Rod Morgan, Robert Reiner 2007

        Book Digitisation Read Chapter 29: Sentencing, by Andrew Ashworth, pp.990-1023

      2. Sentencing guidelines: exploring the English model 2013 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional Read Chapter 11: A ‘decision science’ perspective on the old and new sentencing guidelines in England and Wales

      3. Forensic psychology: concepts, debates and practice - Joanna R. Adler, Jacqueline M. Gray 2010, 2011

        Book Additional Read : What role does punishment play in deterring crime? Practical, theoretical and ethical perspectives.

      4. Reducing crime: the effectiveness of criminal justice intervention - Amanda Perry-Kessaris, Cynthia McDougall, David P. Farrington 2006 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional

      5. Proportionate sentencing: exploring the principles - Andrew Von Hirsch, Andrew Ashworth 2005

        Book Additional dip into this, the whole book is relevant

  21. Session 16: Procedural Justice (Dr Jeffrey DeMarco) 7 items
    Public confidence in criminal justice is receiving increasing attention from social scientists and policy-makers. The criminal justice system relies on co-operation from members of the public to an extent unlike other public services; and notions of ‘legitimacy’ and ‘consent’ are vital if the police and other criminal justice agencies are to function effectively and in accordance with democratic norms. This lecture outlines the empirical evidence on public confidence in criminal justice and considers the factors believed to influence confidence and legitimacy
    1. Essential 3 items
      1. Procedural Justice, Trust, and Institutional Legitimacy - M. Hough, J. Jackson, B. Bradford, A. Myhill 01/08/2010

        Article Essential

      2. Enhancing Police Legitimacy - Tom R. Tyler 05/2004

        Article Essential

    2. Additional 4 items
      1. Contact and confidence: revisiting the impact of public encounters with the police - Ben Bradford, Jonathan Jackson, Elizabeth A. Stanko 03/2009

        Article Additional

  22. Session 17: Consequences of Imprisonment (Dr Lisa Marzano) 6 items
    Imprisonment is a topic of prime interest to the general public yet is rarely well understood. We set incarceration within the context of community based penalties and rehabilitation. In this session we will consider some key questions and debates, including: what, if any are the psychological effects of imprisonment? What is prison life like? What should it be like? Which factors are most likely to affect prisoners’ adaptations to incarceration?
    1. Essential 3 items
      1. Adaptation To Imprisonment - Mandeep K. Dhami, Peter Ayton, George Loewenstein 08/2007

        Article Essential

      2. The effects of imprisonment - Alison Liebling, Shadd Maruna 2005

        Book Essential

      3. Forensic psychology: concepts, debates and practice - Joanna R. Adler, Jacqueline M. Gray 2010

        Book Essential Chapter 23: Women in Prison

    2. Additional 3 items
      1. Psychological Survival, the Experience of Long Term Imprisonment Second Edition - Cohen, Stanley / Taylor, Laurie 1981

        Book Not held by the Library

  23. Session 18: Coping, Suicide and Self-Harm (Dr Lisa Marzano) 10 items
    In this session, we will focus on key debates regarding research and practice on suicide and self-harm in prison. Theoretical models of prison suicide and self-harm will be considered, as well as issues around the assessment, management and prevention of suicide risk in custodial settings.
    1. Essential 2 items
      1. Suicide in prisoners: a systematic review of risk factors - Seena Fazel, Juila Cartwright, Arabella Norman-Nott, Keith Hawton 2008

        Article Digitisation

    2. Additional 8 items
      1. Forensic psychology: concepts, debates and practice - Joanna R. Adler, Jacqueline M. Gray 2010

        Book Additional Chapter 24: Marzano, L. (2010). Self‑harm in prisons: dominant models and (mis)understandings

      2. Suicide in prisons - Martin McHugh, Louisa Snow, Graham J. Towl, British Psychological Society 2000

        Book Additional

  24. Session 19: Offenders in the Community (Dr Eve Hepburn) 11 items
    In this session we will focus on approaches to the supervision and management of adult offenders in the community, primarily by considering the work of Probation practitioners within the National Probation Service. We will explore the roles and responsibilities they have when working with offenders and within the wider Criminal Justice System. Approaches to risk assessment and management, public protection, assessing and addressing offending behaviour and enabling change will be explored; with links made to relevant psychological theory.
    1. Essential 3 items
      1. Home - MTC

        Website Essential Please spend some time with the following website in working with people desisting from crime

      2. Foundations of offender rehabilitation - Sharon Casey 2013

        Book Essential In particular Ch. 2: Theories of Offender Rehabilitation & Ch. 3: Theories of Behaviour and Behaviour Change. Then you may want to look at some of the case examples given at the end of each of Chapters 5/6/7/8, depending on your particular interests, as they helpfully bring theory and practice together.

      3. Forensic psychology: concepts, debates and practice - Joanna R. Adler, Jacqueline M. Gray 2010, 2011

        Book Essential Read Chapter: Psychology in the National Offender Management Service for England and Wales

    2. Additional 8 items
      1. Psychology in probation services - David A. Crighton, Graham J. Towl, Ovid Technologies, Inc 2005 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional In particular, Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5 & 7

      2. Criminal Justice Act 2003

        Journal Additional In particular Part 12 of the Act which covers sentencing, including chapters 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6.

      3. A Future for Probation? - John Deering 02/2014

        Article Additional

      4. Handbook of probation - Loraine Gelsthorpe, Rodney Morgan c2007

        Book Additional For an overview of the history of Probation, changes that have contributed to the development of the service and the “what works” research and agenda for reducing reoffending

      5. Public Protection, Partnership and Risk Penality - HAZEL KEMSHALL, MIKE MAGUIRE 04/2001

        Article Additional

      6. Transforming Rehabilitation: A Strategy for Reform 2013

        Document Additional This makes changes to the supervision of prisoners receiving less than 12 months Custody and creates new Requirements for Community and Suspended Sentence Orders to facilitate the Transforming Rehabilitation Agenda which introduces private providers of Probation Services

  25. Session 20: Desistence, Throughcare and Aftercare (Ben Ross, Critical Time Intervention Lead, Offender Health) 8 items
    Since 1974--when Martinson famously asked “what works” to reduce reoffending--there has been debate as to whether anything “works” and an increasing policy perspective that some things can indeed reduce recidivism and encourage reintegration to society, post punishment. This session considers some of the major approaches in this field, including the Critical Time Intervention model.
    1. Essential 3 items
      1. Forensic psychology: theory, research, policy and practice - Jennifer Brown, Yvonne Shell, Terri Cole 2015

        Book Essential Read chapter 11

    2. Additional 5 items
      1. Foundations of offender rehabilitation - Casey, Sharon, A. Day, J. Vess, T. Ward 2013 (electronic resource)

        Book Additional

      2. Critical Time Intervention | CTI Model | Critical Time Intervention

        Webpage Additional Also, please do spend some time exploring this website

  26. Session 21: Expert Report Writing Workshop (Dr Eve Hepburn and the Learning Enhancement Team) 0 items
    1. Essential 0 items
    2. Additional 0 items
  27. Further Reading 1 item
    You are expected to undertake independent research and to read more widely than the resources provided in this reading list.
    1. The Library's Online Subject Guides (http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/psy) are a good place to start with your research, as they bring together the key research tools for your subject area and offer a wide range of support.

       

       

      Your Subject Liaison Librarian will also help you with your research, finding and accessing resources and referencing your work: